Monday, November 14, 2016

Project 5: STILL LIFE EMPHASIS ON TEXTURE DUE DATE: December 13th (10:30am)

BEGINNING DRAWING ART 111-1 ASSIGNMENT SHEET 
STILL LIFE EMPHASIS ON TEXTURE

MATERIALS:
• Compressed & vine charcoal • Charcoal pencils (full range)
• Graphite pencils (full range)        • Measuring stick & view finder
• Eraser                 • Ruler
• Full Sheet Drawing Paper


SUBJECT MATTER:
• Various Still Life Objects highlighting texture

GENERAL GOAL: Think of all the techniques learned thus far (perspective, value, integration, light to form, pos/neg shape, open/closed form, etc.) to create a drawing, from the still life.  Reflect on and label the principles of design for each of your 10 thumbnail sketches.  In the end, you will reference one of your thumbnail sketches to create a final charcoal drawing on a full sheet of drawing paper.  This assignment focuses on texture so choose a thumbnail that highlights not just one but multiple textures.  

GENERAL INSTRUCTIONS:
• Make at least 10 thumbnail drawings in your sketchbook before you decide on your final composition.
• Experiment with open/closed composition, view point, etc.
• Be creative!  Move around the still life and find new perspectives when drawing.

GENERAL QUESTIONS FOR GRADING:
• Were the basic instructions understood and followed?
• Does the work fail to meet, meet or exceed the basic requirements of the assignment?
• Were the proper materials used?

GRADING CRITERIA:
• Create the illusion of plastic form in space.
• Use a range of values (as definer of edges and complexity).
• Show multiple textures (as definers of form and complexity).
• Accuracy (scale, position, continuity of edge).
• Composition (balance in scale of shapes)(originality).
• Craftsmanship

Critique #1:  November 17th, 2016 (10 sketches from still life due at the beg. of class)
Critique #2:  November 22nd, 2016 (placement, scale, composition)
Critique #3:  December 1st, 2016 (Value & Texture)
Critique #4:  December 8th, 2016 (Final Touches)

DUE DATE:  Tuesday, December 13th, 2016 ((10:30am))









Wednesday, November 9, 2016

Sketchbook Assignment 7 Texture and Pattern DUE: Tuesday, Nov. 15th (At the Beginning of Class)


Texture and Pattern in Inorganic/Organic Drawing


When we look at the world about us, we are conscious not only of form, space, color, dark, and light, but also of tactile qualities, a sense of the feel of surfaces, of roughness and smoothness, hardness and softness –texture. Skillfully used, texture can contribute significantly to expressiveness; lacking a decisive sense of texture, a drawing tends to appear lifeless and weak. The textural character of a drawing is determined by several factors, including the surface portrayed, the drawing materials employed, the method of application, and the artist’s sense of invention.

Texture: refers to the properties held and sensations caused by the external surface of objects received through the sense of touch.

Actual Texture - Physical, tangible texture. Real textures are textures that really exist. They are what you feel if you touch the actual artwork. Physical texture is the texture you can actually feel with your hand. The build up of paint, slipperiness of soft pastel, layering of collaged paper.

Simulated Texture - Creating the visual effect of texture without actually adding texture.

Abstract Texture- Texture that does not seem to match the object it’s connected with so it has the concept of the object translated in textural patterns.

Invented Texture - The creative way of adding alternate materials to create an interesting texture.

Materials: sketchbook, graphite and charcoal pencils (experiment with both)

Purpose of project: Direct observation of the endlessly intriguing details of nature should be added to your repertoire of sketchbook activities. Familiarize yourself with the identifying characteristics of various textures that surround you – inside (i.e. carpet, food, furniture, etc) and landscape (trees, asphalt, etc.)

Instructions:
In your sketchbook create at least twenty sketches that visually illustrate the qualities of texture. For example, you may choose to familiarize yourself with the identifying characteristics of various trees by making quick sketches, both as silhouettes and with simplified shading to define volume (you may choose to develop more finished drawings and that’s ok). Example #2 do a pencil rendering that contrasts the smooth polished surface of an apple with the subtle texture of the rind of an orange or lemon. Include a slice of the orange or lemon (you may also choose to light the forms to show contrast between light and dark).


Each sketch can vary in size and dimension however, make sure the composition is at least 3” by 3”, if smaller than your sketchbook dimensions make sure to create a boarder.

Below are various examples for inspiration:
Please follow the above mentioned criteria for your sketchbook assignment.











Wednesday, October 26, 2016

Project 4: POSITIVE / NEGATIVE SHAPE & COMPOSITION --DUE DATE: THURSDAY, November 3rd at the end of class

BEGINNING DRAWING ART 111-1 ASSIGNMENT SHEET
POSITIVE / NEGATIVE SHAPE & COMPOSITION DRAWING

MATERIALS:
• Eraser                                                • Vine Charcoal
• Compressed Charcoal                       • Charcoal Pencils
• Full Sheet (Drawing Paper)              • Ruler

SUBJECT MATTER:
• Stool, Plants, etc.

GENERAL GOAL: Create a charcoal drawing that is the illusion of a white stool and plants in black space.

GENERAL INSTRUCTIONS:
• Prepare your surface.

• Observe the stool thinking of the negative shapes first.

• Draw equivalents on your paper starting with the largest negative shapes first using your vine charcoal.

• Remember to start your drawing thinking in terms of general to specific.

• Once the composition is set on your paper, use your compressed charcoal to darken the background –solidifying the largest negative shapes.

• Remember; only use negative shapes to define the shape contours of the positive plastic form.

• By the end of your drawing process you should have represented a white stool and plant existing in a black ground.

GENERAL QUESTIONS FOR GRADING:
• Were the basic instructions understood and followed?
• Does the work fail to meet, meet or exceed the basic requirements of the assignment?
• Were the proper materials used?

GRADING CRITERIA:
• Create the illusion of space and illusion of form (stool and plant).
• Use of negative shapes (as definer of edges and complexity).
• Accuracy (scale, position, continuity of edge).
• Composition (balance in scale of shapes)(originality).
• Craftsmanship


DUE DATE: THURSDAY, November 3rd at the end of class

EXAMPLES BELOW:

HERE IS AN EXAMPLE OF POSITIVE AND NEGATIVE SHAPES.  REMEMBER THE NEGATIVE SHAPE IS THE SPACE THAT SURROUNDS THE SUBJECT MATTER.


 EXAMPLE #1

  EXAMPLE #2

  EXAMPLE #3


Sketchbook Assignment 6: PRINCIPLES OF DESIGN - 7 DRAWINGS 1 OF EACH PRINCIPLE -DUE: TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 1st, 2016 (beginning of class)


Seven Principles of Art Organization


In visual art, there are basic principles that artists employ to aid in the creation of unique and dynamic imagery. These principles are often used in varying combinations to achieve differing results. In time, these principles become second nature and are employed in a nearly unconscious manner. They are:


Harmony: The pleasing quality achieved by different elements of a composition interacting to form a whole. Often accomplished through repetition of same/similar forms.


Variety: Differences achieved by opposing, contrasting, changing, elaborating or diversifying elements in a composition to add individualized interest. (*in contrast to harmony)


Balance: Sense of equilibrium achieved through implied weight, attention or attraction by manipulating visual elements within the composition.


Proportion: Comparative scale relationship between differing elements within a composition. For example: the size a hand in relation to a head.


Dominance: When certain elements are more important than others in a composition.

Movement: The directing of eye movement in a composition using varying elements.


Economy: Adjustment of the composition to the basic essentials for clarity of presentation, most often associated with abstraction.


Materials: sketchbook, graphite pencils or charcoal pencils


Purpose of project: This project is designed to familiarize you with the basic principles of visual organization. You should be able to describe these terms in comparison to one another and be able to locate them in different visual compositions. Throughout the rest of the semester we will be continually referring to these principles in critiques and one on one discussion of your work


Instructions:
In your sketchbook, create at least seven sketches that visually illustrate each of the seven principles of art organization. You may observe and draw from other “found” images you have located in your process of researching images that illustrate the seven principles of design.  ALSO YOU CAN GO TO THE BLOG AND REFERENCE THE IMAGES POSTED.

Each sketch can vary in size and dimension however, make sure the composition is at least 3” by 3”, MAKE A BOARDER DEFINING EACH DRAWINGS ORIENTATION.


Once completed, please print name, project title, and specify which principle of design you have drawn. For example: John Doe, Seven Principles of Design,  Balance.



DUE: TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 1st, 2016 (beginning of class)

Please review the Power Point lecture (Principles of Design).


Monday, September 26, 2016

Project 3: LIGHT ON SPHERE --DUE DATE: THURSDAY, October 13TH (at the beginning of class)

BEGINNING DRAWING ART 111-1 ASSIGNMENT SHEET
RELATIONSHIP OF LIGHT TO PLASTIC FORM
PRIMARY AND SECONDARY LIGHT ON SPHERE

MATERIALS:
• Graphite Pencils (Full Range)                       • Eraser
• ½ sheet of drawing paper                              • Ruler

SUBJECT MATTER:
• Sphere

GENERAL GOAL: Create a drawing that is the illusion of light defining plastic form.  Understand and locate the seven aspects of light to help create this illusion.

GENERAL INSTRUCTIONS:
• Allow the primary light source to (clamp light) to be the spot.

• Allow the secondary light source to be the ambient light.  Observe the sphere thinking of the negative shapes first when deciding how to compose the subject.

• Start your drawing thinking in terms of general to specific, first using 2h graphite (light marks) and work towards 3b graphite (darker marks).

• Once the composition is set on your paper, use your full range of graphite pencils to make a series of value transitions from light to dark.

• Using a range of values make shapes on your paper representing plastic form by using “open and closed form”, “gradient transitions”, and the “language of light”.

• By the end of your drawing process you should have represented the sphere integrating into an illusion of space and light.

GENERAL QUESTIONS FOR GRADING:
• Were the basic instructions understood and followed?
• Does the work fail to meet, meet, or exceed the basic requirements of the assignment?
• Were the proper materials used?

GRADING CRITERIA:
• Create the illusion of space and illusion of form (sphere).
Full range of values using hatched and cross hatched lines as definer of edges and complexity (rather than using smudged graphite).
• Accuracy (scale, position, continuity of edge).
• Composition (balance in scale of shapes)(originality).
• Craftsmanship


DUE DATE: THURSDAY, October 13TH (at the beginning of class)





Generic computer generated "light to form" illustration highlighting the phenomenon of light effecting a sphere.



Example of a Beginning Students drawing of light affecting form. 

Note the transitions of value and how the student created the illusion of light effecting form by using the techniques of hatching and cross hatching while building the appropriate values.

Wednesday, September 21, 2016

Sketchbook Assignment 5: VALUE Due: Tuesday September, 27th at the beginning of class

Sketchbook Assignment 5:  Value (Local Value, Step and Gradient Transitions).

This Sketchbook assignment was introduced in class on Thursday, September 22nd, 2016.

Part 1: Using your graphite pencils record the pencils local value by crosshatching a controlled rectangular shape on a sheet of paper in your sketchbook.  Assign a value for each pencil to complete Part 1.  USE THE EXAMPLE BELOW AS YOUR GUIDE.

 





Part 2: Create 2 drawings:
1) STEP transition rectangles
Step Transition -a recognizable and orderly step between values

2) GRADIENT transition rectangles   
Gradient Transition - a seamless transition between values

For this exercise create a 7 step transition rectangle AND a gradient transition rectangle directly underneath using a range of 6B (darkest) through HB (lightest) pencils.

First, mark out seven, 1 inch-wide boxes and fill in the first box with your darkest value. **SEE EXAMPLE DIRECTLY BELOW** 


Second, fill in the 2nd box with your second darkest value. **SEE EXAMPLE DIRECTLY BELOW** 

Third, fill in the 3rd box with your third darkest value. **SEE EXAMPLE DIRECTLY BELOW** 

 Fourth, fill in the 4th box with middle gray value. **SEE EXAMPLE DIRECTLY BELOW** 

Next, Lightest Value

Next, Lightest Value





In the end, your drawings should look close to THE EXAMPLES DIRECTLY BELOW** 


Note the Gradient Transition Directly Below the Step Transition Drawing